Science Show

Speakers

Alice Hesse

Alice Hesse
© Sabine Vierus, darkintolight pictures

 

Doctoral researcher in Physics Education at the IPN Kiel

 

  • Title of your current talk

“Lehrer sind die schlimmsten Schüler?”

 

  • Short description

Teachers need support in implementing innovative and student-centred teaching methods. In my doctoral thesis I am investigating further training for teachers for an innovative teaching approach. In my talk I explain why I chose this path and how in-service training research works in my case.

 

  • What excites you about your subject?

Physics is so much more than boring formulas in dusty books and forced text problems with only one solution. I would like to see pupils given the freedom in class to work out physics connections on their own. This way they can maintain their natural (scientific) interest in the world around us. And thus everyone can discover that physics is everywhere.

 

  • Why are you at the Science Show?

Hardly anyone has an idea of what physics education research is. I want to use the Science Show to show what I am doing in my doctoral thesis and why I decided to do research. And it is great to see the “oh right” moment in the audience when they understand a scientific context. I hope that this will get at least some people excited about science (again).

 

  • What do you want people to learn from the show?

Science is incredibly diverse and the scientists behind it even more so. The myth of the old white man wearing glasses and a lab coat in science is simply no longer correct. The face of science is young and dynamic, and all researchers bring very different backgrounds and stories to share on the Science Show.

 

  • Why do you think science communication is important?

Especially in our highly technological times, it is important that we communicate the methods and results of our research not only within our scientific communities. We also need to disclose to society what is happening in our field. This is the only way we can communicate an appropriate understanding of science and expect discussions on important social issues to be based on science. And this without people feeling excluded because they do not (or cannot) understand these findings.

 

  • Hobbies

Cooking, hiking, yoga, playing guitar

 

  • Favourite travel destination

Does not matter as long as it is nature.

 

You can find my own blog here.

In 2019 I also gave an interview about my doctoral thesis for a podcast; you can listen to the episode here.

 

Carolin Böttcher

Carolin Böttcher
© privat

 

Bachelor student of Biology at the Kiel University

 

  • Title of your current talk

“Pflanzen – Was tun bei zu viel Sonnenschein?”

 

  • Short description

What do plants actually do while we build up our complexion in the sun or slather ourselves thickly with sun cream? I explain different adaptations and acclimatisations of plants to too much sunlight. In my bachelor thesis, I also looked at the chemical components in sunflowers for light protection and investigated whether an enzyme that converts such a substance is upregulated when there is a lot of light.

 

  • What excites you about your subject?

What I find so exciting about biology is that it is so wonderfully diverse and descriptive. Biology also has many links to other STEM subjects. At the beginning of my studies, I would not have thought that I would like botany so much, but there are so many different levels at which you can examine and explore plants. (Besides, they can't run away!)

 

  • Why are you at the Science Show?

I think the Science Show is a great opportunity to present your own research topic or your own interests to other people on smaller and larger stages. It is always a bit of an effort to get up in front of people, but it is really fun, and afterwards you feel proud to have done it. It is a great feeling to be able to entertain people with your own presentation! Besides, I personally find it super exciting to get a brief insight into other scientific fields and to meet new, lovely, and interesting people.

 

  • What do you want people to learn from the show?

The most important thing is to have a few exciting/funny/interesting hours. And it is really good when people learn something new.

 

  • Why do you think science communication is important?

Making research results understandable and communicating them is important because everyone should benefit from them. In addition, I personally find it important to be able to counter fake news and conspiracy theories.

 

  • Hobbies

Baking, being out in nature and looking for plants, cycling, allotment gardening.

 

  • Favourite food

There are many delicious things – but a simple pizza margherita is really good!

 

  • Favourite song

“Fields of gold” by Eva Cassidy (the original is by Sting)

 

  • Favourite travel destination

or rather: “I really want to go there” destination: Canada (Vancouver)

 

Elisa Rosati

Elisa Rosati
© Claudia Eulitz, Uni Kiel

 

Postdoc at the Institute for Clinical Molecular Biology (IKMB) at UKSH

 

  • Title of your current talk

„A quiet chat over a whisky...“ / „Smalltalk mit Whisky...“

 

  • Short description

What happens when a scientist starts random conversation with strangers about their every daily working life? This talk is about “Weird conversation of a normal scientist life”.

 

  • Title of previous talks

“Transplants: the perfect donor match. A matter of outfit!”
“Immunogenetics in inflammation research: Keiner nimmt mir die... Philosophie”

 

  • What excites you about your subject?

I like having the possibility of finding out new, previously unknown things using cutting edge technologies that can analyze microscopic things with high precision.

 

  • Why are you at the Science Show?

On the one side I want to improve my capability of presenting and explaining complex subjects in a simple, understandable way. On the other side, I want to exploit science to people without scientific background to bring Science closer to “normal” people.

 

  • What do you want people to learn from the show?

People should learn that science is much more than being a professor behind a desk. Research and science also mean failure, a very slow learning curve but also very exciting findings and very motivated people behind them. People should enter for a bit in the scientific world and have a taste of it.

 

  • Why do you think science communication is important?

As scientists we have the duty of filling the gap between science and “normal” people. Too often “Science” is seen by people as a very complicated thing only for very intelligent – read “nerd” - people. Instead we need to bring science close to people and show that it is not magic and scientists are not magicians.

 

  • Hobbies

Horse riding, Rollerskating, Latin Dance, Gastronomy

 

  • Favourite food

Don’t have one only, I just love very good food.

 

  • Favourite travel destination

Dolomites in the Alps, Italy

 

Linkedin

Twitter

Institut für Klinische Molekularbiologie

Research Training Group

 

Jacqueline Lindemeyer

Jacqueline Lindemeyer
© Sabine Vierus, darkintolight pictures

 

Master student of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Kiel University

 

  • Title of your current talk

“Scientists for WG-Kühlschrank – eine neue Hoffnung”

 

  • Short description

In my talk I explain why I bought raw meat at the weekly market in high summer, why the lab looked like a restaurant kitchen afterwards and what bacteria-eating viruses have to do with the forgotten food can in the flat-share fridge.

 

  • Titles of previous talks

“E. coli – Aufstieg aus der Unterwelt” (featuring Lina Walther)
“Apoptose – Tod und Zerstörung, aber bitte schön ordentlich” (featuring Lina Walther)
“Niemand ist eine Insel – Von Quallen und Bakterien”

 

  • What excites you about your subject?

The opportunity of understanding basic processes of life in detail, but also guessing how much we still don't know.

 

  • Why are you at the Science Show?

I am at the Science Show because I can bring my enthusiasm for science and my field of study on stage and share it with many people. Also, the Science Show brings together many different people of different disciplines, ages and nationalities to work together and learn from each other. And I also have the opportunity to stand on a stage with plush microbes on my shoulder 😉.

 

  • What do you want people to learn from the show?

An “aha moment” or two, fun and maybe even interest in a topic they were not even aware of before.

 

  • Why do you think science communication is important?

Especially nowadays, when fake news and “alternative facts” are the order of the day, I think it is more important than ever for a scientist to seek a dialogue with people and to communicate what is happening in science, what is possible, but also where the limits lie.

 

  • Hobbies

Reading, baking, handball

 

  • Favourite food

Almost anything that can be topped with cheese, and DESSERT!!!!

 

  • Favourite song

“Bordsteinbier” by Phrasenmäher

 

  • Favourite travel destination

Scotland

 

Jana Schmidt

Jacqueline Lindemeyer
© Sabine Vierus, darkintolight pictures

 

Doctoral researcher in Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Chemistry at the Institute of Pharmacy, Kiel University

 

  • Title of your current talk

“Warum liegt hier eigentlich Stroh rum?”

 

  • Short description

With my lecture I try to show everyone that just because you think you have understood a topic, you are not done with research; that you should never stop asking “Why is there actually straw lying around here?” ;) Besides, you learn something about channel proteins from human pathogenic protozoa.

 

  • What excites you about your subject?

The combination of all STEM subjects: we calculate, model and then measure biological processes down to the atomic level.

 

  • Why are you at the Science Show?

I am a stage kid and love to stand in front of people and entertain them, but I enjoy watching live performances of all kinds just as much. As a schoolgirl I lived that out with theatre, choir and musicals. Now I combine my love of the stage with my science spirit and could not think of anything better.

 

  • What do you want people to learn from the show?

I want them to be well entertained. If you pay attention to us for ten minutes, you should be rewarded with pleasure. You should not even notice that you are "learning" while listening to us 😉.

 

  • Why do you think science communication is important?

How often am I asked, “what do you do with it?”, “what do you need it for?” and “I wouldn't feel like doing that”. This frustrated me after only 2 semesters of my bachelor’s degree. I want to share my fascination with showing people how indispensably important science is for a society, and to communicate this in such a way that questions like those mentioned at the beginning no longer arise, but instead people ask, “can you tell me more about this?” We need mediators between complex technical language and users, this is true in all disciplines (even far away from the university!), and I would like to campaign for this in mine.
 

  • Hobbies

Watching, listening to and re-enacting musicals. Playing Ultimate Frisbee, training and competing in tournaments.

 

  • Favourite food

French fries with mayo

 

  • Favourite song

“Poetry by dead men” by Sara Bareilles

 

  • Favourite travel destination

London and NYC for theatre, Baltic Sea beach for relaxing

 

The most awkward photo of me in the midst of my beautiful colleagues can be found here and there you can also find our latest publications and promotions.


In 2017 I organised the student lab at Kiel University for upper school students; you can read a report about it here.

 

Janina Lange

Janina Lange
© Farah Claußen/Anne Waller/Tobias Oertel, Uni Kiel

 

Postdoc, formerly in the research group Bosch at the Zoological Institute of Kiel University

 

  • Title of your last talk

“Die Antibiotika des 21 Jahrhunderts”

 

  • Short description

My talk is about bacteriophages. These are viruses that only infect and ultimately kill bacteria. In my talk I will discuss the role of bacteriophages in the normal, healthy microbiome and how they can possibly be used to fight resistant bacteria or an imbalance in one's own microbiome.

There is more information about viruses in this video and about bacteriophages in this and this article.

 

  • Titles of previous talks

“A virus a day….”
“Heil Hydra! – Ein Modellorganismus erobert die Welt”

 

  • What excites you about your subject?

The beauty of biology, or in my case microbiology, is that you can always find out new little things that help you to a better understanding of life, how diseases occur and nature.

 

  • Why were you at the Science Show?

What excited me most about the Science Show was the opportunity to let my creativity run free. Here I could present my research or my research topic in a completely different way than in usual scientific lectures. The longer I was there, the more fun it was for me to explain my topic and my motivation to non-scientists. In addition, the Science Show has also given me much personally and has greatly strengthened my self-confidence on stage and in scientific presentations!

 

  • What do you want people to learn from the show?

Science rocks! 😉

 

  • Why do you think science communication is important?

Worldwide, only 18% of people have a high level of trust in science and in scientists. This is probably largely due to the fact that the general public does not know how and what research is being done. This probably also quickly leads to the spread of fake news, because many do not question the article/post they are reading. Science communication is therefore particularly important to create a greater basis of trust between scientists and the public and to educate them about scientific issues.

 

  • Hobbies

Singing, dancing, jogging and bouldering

 

  • Favourite food

Ice cream, definitely 😉

 

  • Favourite song

“Piano Man” by Billy Joel

 

  • Favourite travel destination

Africa. So far I've been to Tanzania, Zanzibar, Kenya, Morocco and Cape Verde. But there is sooo much more to see!


My own blog “The Microbial Girl” is being created here.

 

Jay Bathia

Jay Bathia
© Christina Kloodt, Uni Kiel

 

Doctoral researcher at the Zoological Institute at Kiel University

 

  • Title of your current talk

“Living together? Pay up!”

 

  • Short description

I talk about the inter-dependent relationship between the animal Hydra viridissima and its symbiotic Chlorella algae. I explain how this algae lives inside the cells of the animals and how both the partners benefit each other. I also throw some light on the role of bacteria with these two partners and explain it all with some hand-sketched drawings.

 

  • What excites you about your subject?

I get to study life from a completely different perspective. I can study the complexity that makes a life possible. I get to study how the ‘tiny machines’ of the cells are affected by the environment we live in, the food that we eat and the bacteria with whom we share our body. It also helps me to think that I am ever alone, my bacteria will at least stick to me all the time :P

 

  • Why are you at the Science Show?

I want people to know what research I am doing and Science Show is a perfect platform to do so. I want to show that one can understand science with simplicity and fun. Moreover, I like to talk about my research a lot ;)

 

  • What do you want people to learn from the show?

People should get aware about the breakthrough research in science. It is a great opportunity for them to learn about the complexity of life in a simpler way and realize the importance of all types of research.

 

  • Why do you think science communication is important?

It is important for the people to know, what goes on in their backyard.

 

  • Hobbies

Painting and sketching, Indian classical music, cooking, photography

 

  • Favourite food

There’s a lot from Indian cuisine, so I’ll state from German cuisine. I find German breads, sauerkraut and apfelrotkohl quite intriguing.

 

  • Favourite song

“A million dreams” from the film “The Greatest Showman”

 

  • Favourite travel destination

So far, Garmisch-Partenkirchen and Alps. However, I do have my eyes on black-forest and Yellowstone national park.

 

To know more about Hydra, and bacteria and about the working group, please see here.

To know more about Hydra and algae, please see here.

 

Johanna Ira Blase

Johanna Ira Blase
© Jürgen Haacks, Uni Kiel

 

Doctoral researcher at the Institute of Clinical Molecular Biology at Kiel University and Bachelor student of Midwife Science at HAW Hamburg.

 

  • Title of your current talk

“Klein – kleiner – Viren”

 

  • Short description

In my talk I talk about my fascination with these small pathogens. I explain what viruses actually are, how they are constructed and how they multiply and why it is exciting to deal with them.

 

  • Title of previous talk

“Die kleinen Wunder der Molekularbiologie – und ich mittendrin”

 

  • What excites you about your subject?

What fascinates me most is the detailed knowledge in my field. I am always amazed at how much more you can discover. I am also interested in the connection to medicine and thus to the human also.

 

  • Why were you at the Science Show?

I find nothing more motivating than the feeling that the audience has understood what I have just explained to them on stage.

 

  • What do you want people to learn from the show?

That there is so much to discover and that it is worth asking questions.

 

  • Why do you think science communication is important?

I would like to see scientific knowledge not only shared in the scientific world, but that is should preferably be accessible to everyone. That is why I think there should be more science communication.

 

  • Hobbies

Running, dancing, photography and travelling

 

  • Favourite food

Ice cream

 

  • Favourite song

“Muzik” by Effi

 

  • Favourite travel destination

Cape Town in South Africa

 

If you want to get further involved in science, I think it's always good to talk in person with people from the respective field. I also find the magazines GEO, Spektrum der Wissenschaft and Zeit Wissen very interesting and helpful, especially for new/different subjects.

 

Katja Kuhwald

Katja Kuhwald
© Claudia Eulitz, Uni Kiel

 

Postdoc at the Department of Geography at Kiel University

 

  • Title of your current talk

“Seegras, Sand oder Sonstiges” (in preparation)

 

  • Short description

Seagrass meadows grow as dense carpets in the Baltic Sea and are important habitats. However, the seagrass meadows in the Baltic Sea are endangered. As a geographer I try to find out where seagrass grows in the Baltic Sea using satellite images. I will explain step by step how to turn a satellite image into a map of seagrass meadows.

 

  • Titles of previous talks

“Mit Satelliten die perfekte Badestelle finden”
“Ein Geograph geht baden”
“Ein Tag am See”

 

  • What excites you about your subject?

Geography is incredibly diverse. Each person has their own special field, but at the same time we geographers look at a topic from different perspectives. In addition, geography can use various tools to identify and model spatial relationships. My special field is, for example, observing the earth with satellites (remote sensing). What other method can you use to look at the whole world from your home office?

 

  • Why are you at the Science Show?

In the beginning, I just wanted to fight my stage fright during talks. Now I just enjoy being on stage and presenting my own science with a bit of wit and passion. But I also enjoy the preparatory work, for example, investing endless amounts of time to present content pictorially.

 

  • What do you want people to learn from the show?

To get an idea of how science works and what science does, but with a bit of humour. My work is more than a job to me.

 

  • Why do you think science communication is important?

Science is so diverse and exciting that it would be a shame not to communicate about it. Science is a valuable asset of our society that you can only get excited about if you know about it. Apart from that, I think it is important to show society what happens with public money. It also allows us to dispel clichés like “Oh, geography? Then surely you know what the capital of...”

 

  • Hobbies

Gardening, jumping fitness, mountaineering, cross-country skiing, baking sourdough bread

 

  • Favourite food

I don't really have one; I particularly like organic, regional and seasonal ingredients, preferably from my own garden

 

  • Favourite travel destination

Oberallgäu or rather any place with mountains and lakes

 

Press release about my current research project

My profile on ResearchGate

 

Lina Walther

 Lina Walther
© Jürgen Haacks, Uni Kiel

 

Master student of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Kiel University

 

  • Title of your current talk

“Carl-E, der letzte räumt die Zelle auf”

 

  • Short description

Carl-E is the cell's rubbish man, but on his way from assembling to working in the junkyard a lot can go wrong. Mutations are to blame, and they can be very hard on the body.

More information on the subject can be found here, here and here.

 

  • Titles of previous talks

“E. coli – Aufstieg aus der Unterwelt” (with Jacqueline Lindemeyer)
“Apoptose – Tod und Zerstörung, aber bitte schön ordentlich” (with Jacqueline Lindemeyer)

 

  • What excites you about your subject?

Everything! Uncovering the background of all the functions of the human body, marvelling at the variety of processes behind disease and healing, seeing how the processes work at the molecular level and affect the whole organism, exploring how we can intervene in processes that make people sick, being able to collaborate with other sciences to do that and so much more.

 

  • Why are you at the Science Show?

I love my subject and what we can do with it. I want to bring this fascination and passion to the world. To people who do not know much about all the highfalutin science talk, who want to know how science works, to young people who I want to infect with my enthusiasm for science, to the curious, to those who think they already know everything, to those for whom interest in science was nipped in the bud by the stuffy chemistry teacher, and to those who already know that science can be fun.

 

  • What do you want people to learn from the show?

Curiosity for more, a better understanding of how science works and operates, enthusiasm for (science).

 

  • Why do you think science communication is important?

The image that many people have of science often consists of “it's work that I don't understand, they are conceited and proud of their complexity, science is stupid anyway, I didn't understand it at school” and similar trains of thought, scientists are nerds who want to stay among the “smart” ones. But that is not true! Every thought and every question is important and science can be so fascinating and exciting and is even becoming more and more important in everyday life. And only those who know how things work can make important decisions.

 

  • Hobbies

Playing and coaching handball, mountain biking, playing the guitar

 

  • Favourite food

Chocolate and biscuits

 

  • Favourite song

Too difficult, give me heavy (electric) guitars and I'm happy ;)

 

  • Favourite travel destination

Doesn't matter, as long as it's somewhere different every time.

 

Mariam Abuladze

Alice Hesse
© privat

 

Medical Doctor, Doctoral candidate at the Medical Faculty at Kiel University

Research Field: Paediatric Neurology, Epilepsy, Neurophysiology

 

  • Title of your current talk

“Neuronal networks in Epilepsy”

 

  • Short description

I am trying to explain what the basis of brain functioning is and changes that contribute to epileptic seizure development. The main aim is to understand how the brain regions act and interact with each other, then to be able to solve the epileptic cases which are untreatable until now.

There is more information here.

 

  • What excites you about your subject?

I think the brain is the most unknown, but the most interesting organ of our systems. Working in neurology and especially in paediatric neurology is like a solving detective cases every day, where the brain is the main criminal. Especially getting many solved cases at the end keeps me motivated.

 

  • Why are you at the Science Show?

I think being the part of the science show is a great opportunity to express yourself, to show the power of the science and try to make it understandable for others who are not aware of this field.

On the other side getting such experience and guidance from experts, helps me improve my talking, presenting skills.

 

  • What do you want people to learn from the show?

I think it is very important to show people how many and various studies are being conducted at the university and learn how important this investment is for our future.

 

  • Why do you think science communication is important?

It is important to make others understand that the scientific studies are being conducted not only for the scientists and people’s opinion is important to us.

 

  • Hobbies

Running, Painting

 

  • Favourite travel destination

Kazbegi in Georgia

 

Mirco Mührenberg

Mirco Mührenberg
© Jürgen Haacks, Uni Kiel

 

Master student of International Comparative Sociology and Political Science at Kiel University

 

  • Title of your current talk

“Peking-Ente oder Russisch Kaviar?”

 

  • Short description

In my bachelor thesis, I used a sociological film analysis to examine the James Bond films in terms of racist stereotypes. James Bond is a fictional character, but the creation of such feature films brings with it social responsibility. Opinions, norms, and power structures are consciously and unconsciously woven into the films; recognising and naming them is the goal of my research.

 

  • What excites you about your subject?

I find sociology so exciting because it deals with how people live together socially. It is about the meaning of social action, fundamental structures, group behaviour, relationships and much more. I especially like the fact that it trains analytical and critical thinking.

 

  • Why are you at the Science Show?

My goal is to use the research in my bachelor thesis to motivate people not to see films as short-term entertainment, but to watch them consciously, to reflect on what they see and to question it.

 

  • What do you want people to learn from the show?

I am happy that we can show how scientific work functions and that it is not dry or boring, but rather varied and exciting.

 

  • Why do you think science communication is important?

Scientists don't do research for themselves but gain knowledge that can help everyone. Therefore it is necessary to make the progress of knowledge accessible to as many people as possible.

 

  • Hobbies

Darts, fitness, jogging, movies

 

  • Favourite song

“Ohne Dich” by Rammstein

 

  • Favourite travel destination

Blackpool

 

For a critical examination of the James Bond films, I recommend the anthology “The Spy Who Impressed Me – Zur kollektiven Wirkung und kulturellen Bedeutung von James Bond-Filmen”. This book critically reflects on various aspects of the films; for example, it deals with representations of foreignness, geopolitics and the habitus of James Bond.


At the beginning of 2019 I was awarded the Certificate for Science Communication. A report on this can be found here.

 

Tabea Löblein

Tabea Löblein
© privat

 

Master student of biology at Kiel University

 

  • Title of your current talk

“Was tun, wenn Medikamente nicht mehr wirken?”

 

  • Short description

For some years now there have been shocking news about treatable diseases that can have deadly consequences due to (multi-)resistant germs. In my talk I will talk about why resistant bacteria are (partly) quite normal, why and how they can become a problem and what new treatment options are being researched in the laboratory.

 

  • What excites you about your subject?

The versatility! Both watching birds outside and studying evolutionary adaptations of bacteria to antibiotics in the lab are part of biology - and both are really fun!

 

  • Why are you at the Science Show?

I like to distance myself a little from the specific research topics and being a “nerd” every now and then and look more at the big picture again. It's fun to think about how to make your knowledge accessible to everyone and to give people the opportunity to have a look at everyday laboratory life and research.

 

  • What do you want people to learn from the show?

The goal is achieved when everyone has had a good time and learned (a little) something. :)

 

  • Why do you think science communication is important?

Through science communication exchange takes place. It often helps to listen to the voices of others, both when finding new ideas and when solving problems. I also think it's a shame that science is made so difficult to access through various channels and would like take a part in changing that.

 

  • Hobbies

Climbing (both bouldering and with ropes), horses, doing something with friends, e.g. a day at the beach, cooking or barbecuing, a short bike ride, or just a cosy Disney or games evening.

 

  • Favourite food

It depends on the day... pizza and crêpes are usually good options.

 

  • Favourite song

Phew, that's really hard.

 

  • Favourite travel destination

Somewhere in Europe. I have never been anywhere I didn't like yet and you don't have to travel too far!

 

Timon Heyn

Alice Hesse
© Cynthia Melcer und Nele Rohlf, Uni Kiel

 

Postdoc at the Institute of Human Nutrition and Food Science, Dept. of Food Technology, Kiel University

 

  • Title of your current talk

“The Scientific Kitchen Show – Wie koch ich mir Nano-Fibrillen?”

 

  • Short description

The protein in milk can grow into nano-fibrils under certain conditions (high heat in combination with acid). These are thread-like structures that are 10,000 times thinner than a human hair. In my talk I show how these fibrils are formed and what they can be used for.

 

  • Title of previous talk

“Spagetti-Eis in XXS – Wie aus Milchprotein Nanofäden werden” (My talk at “Spätschicht trifft Wissenschaft” at Giovanni L.)

 

  • What excites you about your subject?

We all come into contact with processed food every day. Everyone processes food themselves by preparing (hopefully) delicious meals from it, then crushing (eating) it in the mouth and then feeding (digesting) it to the further biochemical processing factory of their body. Food is therefore a wonderfully sensory, scientific experiment taken directly from everyday life.

PS: I love food!

 

  • Why are you at the Science Show?

I like the idea of being able to infect other people with my enthusiasm for food. It is also an entertaining way (for myself too) to tell people about my research.

 

  • What do you want people to learn from the show?

If you go through the world with open eyes and a good dose of curiosity, you can always discover new secrets. Even in the most mundane foods.

 

  • Why do you think science communication is important?

Scientists are people who fight their way through the jungle of science in search of new discoveries. It does not matter whether the research journey takes place through a macrocosm or a microcosm, and it doesn't matter whether the desired goal is reached. In the end, there are exciting and fascinating stories to tell. Here, however, it is true that scientists can be brilliant minds – but also lousy storytellers. The principles of science communication are a great tool to make the research journeys of scientists tangible for everyone.

 

  • Hobbies

Experimenting with food in the KitchenLab (cooking), discovering the world by bike and singing beautiful songs with the TrioChor Kiel.

 

  • Favourite food

Nano-fibrils of course... :-P

...no seriously: At the moment the “smoky, spicy, melt-in-your-mouth delicacies” from my garden's own smoker.

 

  • Favourite song

Uti vår hage

 

  • Favourite travel destination

Ostholstein

 

We presented our 2019 research project at the Hannover Messe.

A Swiss research group led by Raffaele Mezzenga has made many interesting discoveries about the benefits of nano-fibrils from milk protein. Information is available here, here, here and here.


My own research is listed in Google Scholar and of course you are welcome to read it here.

 

Further profiles follow

 

The answers of the speakers have been edited.